Moms on Monday / Storytelling is dangerous

“Storytelling is dangerous to those who profit from the way things are because it has the power to show that the way things are is not permanent.  Not universal and sometimes, not even necessary.” 

-Ursula Le Guin


 

Hello fellow families of delightful children who happen to be identified with Cortical Visual Impairment,

There are several mothers out there who have let me know that they are working on a post for Moms on Monday.  Ladies, I thank you. I’m a mom and it’s Monday, so I’m going to invite you once again to share a part of your and your child’s story with us. When you have the time, of course.

As we all know, and as Dr. Roman-Lantzy frequently says, CVI Moms are the busiest people we know.

We are the busiest people she knows because we are working tirelessly to get our children acknowledged and accommodated in a system that is not built to acknowledge or accommodate them.

The way things are is exhausting and discouraging.  

I hope to gather as many stories as possible as a resource of personal experiences for families. Every story is important.  Please know that there are no wrong answers.  You can write something original, or you can use the questions in the Calling All CVI Moms post as a starting point.  You can help another parent just by allowing your voice to be heard and allowing your child to be seen.


There is another reason for collecting stories.

As the writer Ursula Le Guin reminds us, the way things are is not permanent.

Not universal and not even necessary.

Let that percolate for a minute.

The way things are is not permanent

Not. Universal.

And 

Not. Even. Necessary. (This is my favorite part.)

We have a unique ability to assess the shortcomings of the systems we are fighting. (Did you ever think you’d be an expert on neurology, ophthalmology, neuroscience, & methods of teaching children with sensory loss?  Me neither.) 

From our shared experiences, we have the ability to imagine a better way and to work towards a Way things are” that recognizes and provides for children with CVI.  

Our stories will become a spotlight on inefficient, outdated methods of data collection and a tone deaf educational system. Our children matter. They need to be counted. They need to be taught, actually taught. (ACCESS! They must have access! They are not incidental learners! Sorry, I just had to get that out.)

As CVI families begin to advocate, they will find themselves in the offices of their elected officials and speaking in front of school boards. When CVI families begin to advocate, they may feel as though they are fighting an uphill battle (yep) and that they are alone (NOPE)

The methods of keeping track of our children on local, state, and even the federal level are woefully inadequate.  States vary in their expectation of counting children with special needs, and CVI does not even make it on the list of many states.  It is still called “Cortical Blindness” in many places.  We need to change that.

If the children are not identified, and not accounted for, then the funding necessary to provide resources will not be included in your state budget or the federal budget.

There are plenty of state legislators who will not want to give you the time of day because you and your story represent more expenses in your state’s government.  That is just too bad because it’s your budget too.  You live in and pay taxes in your state.  Heck, you vote!  (Please vote.)   Your friendly neighborhood legislator needs to meet with you, a friendly neighborhood constituent.

Here’s an example of the power of storytelling.

When we moved to Indiana, Eliza was 2 years old.  She had one more year of early intervention.  She was globally delayed.  We qualified for several therapies, occupational, physical, speech and developmental therapy.  I was so grateful to have access to these services.  I knew, however, that her lack of usable vision was going to affect how useful all the other therapies were, so I asked about early intervention for vision loss.

I was directed to the Indiana First Steps matrix – the database for all of the providers in the state.  When I entered “visual impairment,”  the name of an Optometry professor at Indiana University came up.

One name.

For the entire state.

And, the description mentioned making an appointment to come to his office to have your child assessed for glasses.  Not home visits.  Not early intervention.

What about the children who were blind?  Or, who, like Eliza, were legally blind due to Cortical Visual Impairment and who needed to be taught to see?

I asked around and was referred to the Indiana State School for the Blind and Visually Impaired.  I was able to set up an appointment with the Outreach TVI who came to my house to meet Eliza and me a few weeks later.  She was the most wonderful and experienced TVI.  She knew about CVI.  She understood the lack of access and calmed my fears.  She gave me several articles and showed me some ways to interact with Eliza that had not occurred to me.  She stayed for over 2 hours.

My prayers were answered.

I asked to schedule our next appointment.

And, I discovered that this wonderful TVI had a caseload of over 300 children.

One teacher was the entire early intervention team for infants and toddlers who were blind or had severe vision loss.  She drove around the state staying as long as she could, providing everything she could in the very limited time and with the very limited resources available to her.  She knew it was not nearly enough.  What she provided was what the system would allow.

It was just how things were.

By the time she could see Eliza again, Eliza would have aged out of early intervention.

How was that okay?

To make a long story a tad shorter, I eventually found myself testifying before committees at the Indiana Statehouse about the lack of early intervention for infants and toddlers with vision loss.  I poured my heart out about how hard it had been to have a baby I could not reach while some committee members chatted or got up and left. (Not all. Some were very receptive.)  I had meetings with state representatives who did not crack a smile the entire time I sat across from them.   It was easy to walk away from these experiences and think that nothing would change.

I also had meetings with state representatives to vowed to work with me and did.

statehouse

Image:  Three women seated around a table.  Annie Hughes and Rebecca Davis meeting with policy staff at Indiana Statehouse.

Over time and with the help of Indiana State Senator Mark Stoops, and his brilliant policy director, LeNee Carroll, Indiana made changes to its Birth Defects Registry (worst. name. ever.).  We got CVI and visual impairments added.  We were able to advocate for and to build a system of early intervention services specifically for children with vision loss.

We (that wonderful TVI, Annie Hughes, an agency called Visually Impaired Preschool Services, and a group of kickass families) changed the way things were.  

It can be done.

After your interaction with the cranky legislator who does not want to fund more services for children with special needs, you can tell Rep. Cranky to go to CVI Momifesto to meet more parents of children with CVI and to learn more about what they have gone through.  The stories here can provide back up.

There is more back up on the way.  2018 will indeed be a turning point in the awareness of CVI.  Many CVI moms are working to make sure of this.

You have the power to change the way things are.

gals

Image:  Three women standing with arms linked.  Meredith Howell (CVI Mom) and Annie Hughes from VIPS Indiana, and Rebecca Davis

 

 

Moms on Monday #12 / Anna from OH

Happy Monday morning fellow families of glorious children who happen to have CVI,

This morning I am so glad to have permission to share the words and the works of a mother who has helped lay the foundation of the Pediatric CVI Society over the past few years.  She has made great strides in raising awareness about CVI in her local community through her creative fundraising methods. In addition, she and her oldest daughter, Olivia, have been active in changing societal perceptions of children with special needs.

Anna from Ohio is the mother of three beautiful, energetic children and a RN who teaches student nurses.

In 2013, Anna started a blog, Hope She Smiles (http://oliviacansmile.blogspot.com) to chronicle her family’s experiences after her daughter, Olivia, was born.  Anna gave me permission to repost some of her inspiring blog.

Thank you Anna and Olivia!

From September 2013

“Take her home and hope she smiles” was the quote from the Neonatalogist the day after our sweet Olivia was born. 

The question that I’ve been asking myself over the past week is, “Where do I start?”

Usually the best place to start is at the beginning, but historically I do not follow the path that is paved. In an attempt to answer questions that I am frequently asked by other parents of children with CVI is, I will focus on the present with the past sprinkled in.

In August of 2007, we didn’t know what Olivia’s future held. We heard news from the NICU team at West Penn Hospital that would change our life forever. After suffering seizures and apnea 12 hours after birth, she was life-flighted to Pittsburgh. Her diagnosis was massive stroke in utero, cause undetermined.

What did this mean for her, her development, and her quality of life? We had so many unanswered questions. As a nurse myself, I struggled with understanding what this meant for a newborn. I knew in that moment that I was not acting as a nurse, but as a mother. A mother? I had only been a mother for 24 hours and I didn’t know what I was supposed to do.

SO the present…Where is Olivia now?

With the help of Early Intervention; Occupational, Physical, Speech, Vision therapies, follow up appointments; and a new appreciation for special needs children we were on our way.

She is currently in Phase III of the CVI Range and I know all of the above, plus other things that I will be mentioning in future blog posts, have been instrumental in getting us to this point.

Her main diagnosis resulting from the stroke: Cortical Visual Impairment (CVI). Luckily we were connected with Dr. Christine Roman-Lantzy from the Pediatric View Program when Olivia was only a few days old.

(Dr. Roman) has taught us that the focus should be on her vision, because it CAN improve. This statement gave us extreme hope and determination.

Olivia is in Kindergarten now and is a social butterfly. She is extremely happy and energetic. She can not only smile, but learned to walk, run, jump, ride a bike with training wheels, swim with a life jacket, horseback riding. We have even taken her ice skating.

Our approach to her and her diagnosis is “Let’s try it” Sometimes it is a success and she surprises us beyond belief and sometimes it fails and we vow to try again at a later date.

I believe our nontraditional approach has led us to where we are now.

From September 29, 2013 post entitled “Hope”ful

Hope” she smiles…

The word hope was a word I used often in my life previous to the birth of my daughter:
I hope…we win the game.
I hope…I pass my test.
I hope…I make a lot of money.”

Hope” now has an entirely different meaning. My outlook has changed since my first 30 years.

It all changed when I heard those words, “Take her home and hope she smiles.”

Hope has given me the drive to seek out interventions and modalities that will improve Olivia’s life. It has given us strength when the road that we are on proves to be challenging and frustrating. It has secured my belief in the blessings of God.

Hope reminds me that no one is perfect, we all have challenges that we face. I am proud to be helping Olivia meet those challenges head on.

Hope drives me to find a way.

Hope doesn’t come without disappointments. I hope for her to see, talk, read and write like all the other kids. I hope for her to make lasting friendships. Hope-fully these accomplishments will just take a littlemore time.

Lastly, I need to mention what drives hope. What is the fuel that gives us hope? Only one word…LOVE

From September 2013 post A Whole New World

My occupation is an RN. Currently, I work as a course instructor at a school of nursing. My job is to educate future nurses. I spend hours preparing objectives, lectures, exams, quizzes and teaching on the clinical unit.

I admit that I feel guilty that I devote so many hours of the day educating others when I have a child at home in need of learning a basic function–sight.

I am concerned when I send her off to school will she be learning in an atmosphere and a way that CVI children need to learn.

I have to somehow learn to let go and entrust other people, other professionals, to do their job.

But do they really know about CVI and all that it entails? Are they good enough for my child? I believe every parent feels this way regardless of the situation.

I do understand how crucial these early years are in the development of her vision. It can improve. But how?

Traditional methods used for visually impaired children to learn do not work for children with cortical visual impairment. The educators need to realize this and be able…no, willing…to adapt her learning appropriately.

So my goal is to find that way. 

Bridging into Phase III on the CVI Range is a miraculous happening for my sweet Olivia. But the road through phase 3 seems to be a very complicated one. One that even the experts in the field don’t know how to conquer.

So I accept that challenge. I vow to find a way. My goal is for Olivia to reach a 10 on the CVI range. A 10 means that she functions as a child with no visual impairment would function. Why not? Why not attempt to reach for 10?

Remembering back to our NICU days about a week after Olivia was born, I remember one of the neonatologist saying to us, “Reach for the stars. If you miss, you have lost nothing.” This became our approach to Olivia and to her future.


Anna was instrumental in raising the funding that allowed the Pediatric CVI Society to achieve non-profit status.  Anna and Olivia have done some very creative fundraisers.  Even Olivia’s friends have risen to the challenge of supporting the PCVI Society.

In 2015, Anna’s efforts were recognized by the PCVI Society.  She was the first inductee to the PCVI Society Hall of Fame.

President Dr. Richard Legge said in his remarks, “Without ever being to a meeting, she dedicated herself heart and soul to making PCVIS a reality.”

I loved her speech about fundraising.  I think it resonates for many of us.

We fundraise for Olivia for a better future. I have a confession to make… The fundraising was completely self-serving.

I want better access to pertinent information about CVI. I want access to the professionals in the field. I want to know what the newest developments and research shows regarding CVI. I want to know the best interventions that can be used for children with CVI. I want it for myself and others in my place.

From the beginning of this journey I have been hungry. Hungry for knowledge, like most of you here. Parents, teachers of the visually impaired, speech therapists, occupational therapist, physicians, ophthalmologists… we are all want to be fed CVI knowledge. This society can feed us.
To start fundraising you first have to be willing to go out on a limb, get out of your comfort zone. Ask for donations. It can be scary, but jump in. We would jump into a pool to save our child if they are sinking to the bottom of the pool. We wouldn’t think twice. Jump in for our children. Save them.
Second; share your story, make a connection, and open up. Open up the dialogue with others about what CVI is. Keep your donors in the loop. Keep them informed of the ongoing fundraising, the intent and goals of the society, and the mission statement.
This past year, our supporters donated to our cause in good faith. I asked for donations to a Society, that wasn’t even a society…yet! And they did. The American Cancer Society started somewhere. This is our starting place.

Some of our examples of fundraising include a lemonade stand, an apple cider stand, thirty-one fundraiser, Jamberry fundraiser, Arbonne fundraiser. Other donations came from a fundraiser from Olivia’s elementary school, my co-workers that took up a collection for Christmas, other anonymous donations, and those that donated through the go fund me page. Don’t discount small fundraisers because they add up. If we all participate in fundraising, this society can grow even stronger and even bigger, helping more children with CVI.


 

Did she smile?  Yes!  And she hasn’t stopped!

IMG_5272

Adventures in Advocacy / Anger & Courage

Hope has two beautiful daughters; their names are Anger and Courage.  

Anger at the way things are, and Courage to see that they do not remain as they are.  

-St. Augustine of Hippo

I heard this quote during a presentation a couple of weeks ago.  I really needed it this week.

It was a week of preparation for the next round of IEP meetings for my daughter.  As is the new (ab)normal at times like this, I feel overwhelmed, underprepared, and anxious about what comes next.  Every time we go over a new report, we have to compare it to the old reports and I am reminded of what I didn’t know then and then I wonder how much I just don’t know now.  It’s very busy in my head right now.  Reading over past notes and goals I disagreed with leave me frustrated.

I feel like a clenched fist with hair.

(And, nothing else gets done.  Laundry?  Groceries?  You mean we still have to wear clothes and eat?  Haven’t you people done that enough already?  There are reports to read, questions to ask, and schools to visit, dang it!)  

Thankfully, it was also a week in which I was able to participate in a conversation with a group of mothers and a dynamic TVI.  These ladies are determined to make 2018 the year we DO something about CVI on a grand scale here in the U.S.  Listening to the passionate ideas coming from them made me smile and left me with more than a little more optimism than I had that morning.

Now, I feel like a clenched fist with hair and optimism.

This past week, while preparing for the uncertain transition facing my family, I also found myself impressed with the resolve of the CVI families’ growing efforts to raise awareness and to change the current systems of service for our children.

You could say I was living between Hope’s two beautiful daughters if you wanted to be particularly cheesy and need to find meaning in everything you read or hear.  I am particularly cheesy.  I do obsessively look for meaning in everything I read or hear (I wrote the St. Augustine quote on my hand so I wouldn’t forget it, for Pete’s sake.  Now I’m wondering – shouldn’t it be that “Hope has two beautiful parents”?  Wouldn’t that make more sense? That Hope is the result of Anger and Courage?  Will I be struck by lightning for questioning a saint?  Probably.  I warned you it gets busy in my head. My apologies to St. Augustine.)   

As the mother of child with multiple special needs and a vision processing disorder few people understand, I am familiar with anger.

The fundamentals we want for our children are that they are protected, capable, and educated to the best of their abilities.  Easy enough, right?  (Cue the hysterical laughter.  I’ll wait while you catch your breath.)

For parents like us, this includes the extra full time job of raising awareness and educating everyone we come into contact with that – say it with me – CVI is the #1 pediatric visual impairment in First World Countries.  

If you are familiar with anger as well, WELCOME.  You are in good company.

Anger is an energy.  (My apologies to Johnny Rotten.)  

Anger is a building block for Hope.


There is plenty to be hopeful about.

Conversations are happening between families and agencies in the blindness community.  These families are acting straight from the heart out of the all too common mixture of love and frustration we feel as we force  the world to recognize Cortical Visual Impairment and our children.

Soon, there will be a need to ask for more families to reach out, to ask questions, to make themselves and their stories known.

This growing group of parent advocates and TVI will be asking you to join us.  We will need you to reach out to agencies, legislators, and others to educate them about CVI, to let ourselves be counted, and to let them know that our children matter.

We will provide the information you need to feel well-equipped to share your stories.

I hope you will allow yourself to be included.

——————————————————————————————————————————-

This is where the courage part comes in.

You may not think that you want to be someone who will stand up and be counted.

I think that you already are.

Brene Brown, the author and  research professor widely known for her work studying courage, vulnerability, empathy, and shame, describes courage this way:

“Courage is a heart word.

The root of the word courage is cor – the Latin word for heart.

In one of its earliest forms, the word courage meant “To speak one’s mind by telling all one’s heart.”

“Speaking from our hearts is what I think of as ‘ordinary courage.’

As a CVI parent, you operate from the heart every. single. day.  

Every time you make the attempt to educate a doctor or a teacher about CVI, you are speaking from your heart,  You are being courageous.

And, you are making it easier for the mom who will come after you.

The actions you take from the heart are courageous actions.

Reading this post, researching online, following FB conversations, making D-I-Y materials to accommodate your child’s level of vision – all of these activities come straight from your heart.  Through love, you perform acts of courage every day.

Join us as we speak from our hearts, taking our ‘ordinary courage‘ to a wider audience.

ACT of COURAGE/ ACTION ITEM: 

Send your contact info – Name, Email Address, and State to info@cvimomifesto.com. 

Your information will go on a growing list of families facing the same challenges.  The information will not be given to any other agencies.  This is a mom fueled project.  We will use the information to keep you updated on future opportunities to advocate.  

 

 

 

Adventures in Advocacy / MaryAnne Roberto

Movements do not form out of the actions of one or two people.

When you study history you begin to see the patterns of how change occurs.  The frustrations of a relative few become the conversations and the questions that seek out others.

I thought it was just me

gets thrown by the wayside for

What are WE going to do about this?

CVI Moms, collectively WE have spent thousands of days, months, years knocking our heads on the brick wall that is the challenge of finding an appropriate education for a child with CVI.

For a long time, it thought it was just me.  I found out I was so wrong.  I wrote a blog post about Kate Keller.

MaryAnne Roberto, a CVI endorsed TVI and mother to 2 boys who are blind wrote a powerhouse of a letter using examples from history and her own story.

Read this letter.    Get ready to write your own.

MaryAnne Roberto
Envision CVI Consulting, LLC
envisioncvi@gmail.com

Craig Meador, President
American Printing House for the Blind
January 10, 2018
Dear Mr. Meador

I read your letter on the APH Facebook page about all the exciting things APH is doing in 2018 to “Make Big Things Happen”. As the mother of two boys who are blind, the information about advances in technology that will be highlighted and promoted in the new year was exciting. One of my sons is totally blind and gifted. He will benefit from the innovative technology that brings the written and graphic world quite literally to his fingertips so that he can access the same information as his peers.

Both of my sons are adopted, and spent their early years in orphanages in China where they were left to exist with no interventions, no education, no access to the world around them. The nannies in their orphanages loved them, I am sure, but had no ability to ‘break down the barriers of accessibility’ for them. They lived in a country where children who are blind are not educated, and are thought to be ‘less than’ the typical population of children.

People did not understand them, and gave them less than adequate tools to prepare them for learning and thriving. They were left out of most of what went on around them. And then, they were adopted, came home to a family with a mother who is a Teacher of the Visually Impaired, and father who is a former Health and Phys Ed teacher at a school for the blind. Their lives changed, and they are now thriving, learning, and in have great potential for success in their lives. Sounds like a fairy tale with a happy ending, right?

For the children with Cortical Visual Impairment in our country, there is no “happy ending.” 

Like my sons’ experiences in China they are often left to exist in classrooms and programs where there is little to no appropriate education and have no visual access to the world around them.

They are taught by teachers who have had inadequate instruction in their diagnosis, and treated by medical professionals who often do not understand this complex condition.

Their true potential cannot be known when they are not given a chance to experience it themselves.

‘Band aid’ programming is thrown at them, IEPs and strategies are guessed at and implemented, and team members are satisfied that they are ‘doing the best they can’ to serve the needs of the largest population of children with visual impairments in our country.

And so, when I read your post as a mother of two blind sons, I was of course excited about all APH had to offer for the future. But, to be honest with you, my sons’ needs are well-known to their teachers. They are registered for the Federal Quota, receive all the adaptive equipment they need, and are given appropriate services. Their needs are handled by professionals who write accurate goals, collect specific data, and order necessary materials for them.

At the same time, I read your post as a Teacher for the Visually Impaired, and a Perkins-Roman CVI Endorsed specialist, and I was quite disappointed. Nowhere in your post did you even mention the diagnosis that accounts for more than half of the children with visual impairments in our country. There was not a whisper of new advances in research and evaluations, no talk of new technology such as CVI Connect, no discussion of the growing need to reach the children who are learning to read in new and innovative ways.

Your post screamed of Braille access and instruction and was deafeningly silent on the children who are not taught to use their vision to learn, but are treated as if they have no vision at all.
I am privileged to work closely with many parents who are rallying to fight for appropriate services for their children with CVI. Much like Helen Keller’s parents, these parents are not willing to sit back and let the ‘powers that be’ provide inadequate services for their children. They fight long and hard and are met with resistance at every turn, and mostly from the world of educators of the visually impaired. Their voices are getting louder, and their cries are beginning to be heard. Unlike the Kellers, however, many of these families do not have the money or connections to affect real change, but slowly, surely, they are making changes in their children’s lives.
Yet, like Helen Keller and her family, who waited years to find an Annie Sullivan, these families are waiting as well. They are waiting for appropriate university programs that will educate future teachers on their children’s visual impairment, waiting for schools and programs to recognize the need for adequate services, and waiting for organizations like yours to put their children at the top of their priority list to ‘Make Big Things Happen’.
I write this letter to you as both an Annie Sullivan and a Kate Keller. As a mother of blind sons and a teacher of the visually impaired I know well the roads that both Annie and Kate walked, The road that Annie walked was paved with determination and fortitude. The road Kate walked was paved with tears and desperation for the little girl she loved so deeply. In our country today, there are far too many Kate Kellers whose roads are paved with tears and desperation, as they beg for appropriate services and materials for their children with CVI. The Annie Sullivans are ill-prepared to support those children or are not interested in learning new techniques.
And organizations like yours with national and international notability and resources have added to their frustrations and desperation by completely ignoring their children.

As Annie and Kate, I am writing to petition your organization to provide more comprehensive education and materials that will support children with CVI in our country. CVI Connect is one product that can be added to the Federal Quota program to give access to activities and much-needed data to support the students in programs to develop their visual potential. By promoting resources and education in CVI, you will quite literally ‘Make Big Things Happen’ for children, who like my own sons when they sat in orphanages half a world away, have little access to the world. We can do better for our CVI kids, and we can give hope to the thousands of Kate Kellers who cry in desperation for appropriate programming for their children.
Thank you for taking the time to read this letter. I would be more than happy to speak with you regarding your commitment to improve the lives of children with CVI through the American Printing House for the Blind’s resources and education.

Sincerely,
MaryAnne Roberto
Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired
Perkins-Roman CVI Endorsed Specialist

 

Thank you MaryAnne for this important lesson in advocacy!

Now, CVI Moms, what are we going to do about it?  

Moms on Monday #10 / Kate Keller from AL

We are going back in history for today’s Mom on Monday.

Since 2018 will be a year for determined (ok, fed up) parents to advocate for our children with CVI, I wanted to start the year with some historical perspective, and, perhaps, a different spin on a very familiar story.

You may recognize the last name of this particular mom from Alabama, just as you would recognize the name of her very famous daughter, Helen Keller.

We all know the story of “The Miracle Worker.”  Well, I hope we all do.  A few years ago, I learned that one state had dropped Helen Keller, her story and her books (The Story of My Life, Light in My Darkness, Optimism  & The World I Live In, to name a few) from their curriculum.  I don’t know if this is a common occurrence in today’s elementary schools.  I sincerely hope not because the story of Helen Keller’s life and her experiences with her gifted teacher, Anne Sullivan Macy, make for some of the most inspiring storytelling in American history.  Anne Sullivan Macy’s own harrowing childhood and fight for education makes her lifelong dedication to Helen Keller even more compelling.

Mark Twain coined the phrase, “The Miracle Worker” after he read of Anne Sullivan’s success teaching Helen Keller, a young deaf-blind child.  The Miracle Worker became the title of a play and a movie depicting Anne and Helen’s early days together.

It is a story of hope.

It is a story of determination.

It is a story of triumph over seemingly insurmountable odds.

And, as with every great story, there is more to it.

Before the story of the Miracle Worker could happen, there had to be parents who believed in miracles.

Kate Keller

Image:  Kate Keller

Captain Keller

Image:  Arthur Keller

In the 1880’s, after Helen was left deaf and blind following a severe illness at the age of 19 months, Kate and Arthur Keller spent years looking for a teacher who could reach her.   Their efforts went directly against popular opinion that children “like Helen” were not teachable.

Kate Keller wrote countless letters to schools and doctors across the country.  The Kellers often traveled for days from Alabama to see doctors in the northeast. They spent countless hours and dollars seeking out (often discouraging) “expert” opinions.

Years passed. As Helen grew more isolated, her behavior became more difficult to manage.  Relatives called Helen a “monster” and advised them to send her away.

That Helen did not languish in isolation and ignorance is the triumph of her parents who believed that  education (in the opinion of the time, “a miracle”) was possible.

Five years passed before the Kellers were introduced to Anne Sullivan.  Five years.

(As the parent of a child with CVI and multiple disabilities I have often said that the days last forever, but the years fly by.  I think about how long those five years must have been for Kate Keller.) 

helen and annie

Image:  A young Helen Keller seated on a chair holding a doll on her lap.  Anne Sullivan sits on the ground next to her.

 

Kate, Annie, Helen

Image:  Kate Keller, Anne Sullivan Macy fingerspelling into the hand of Helen Keller as a young woman


Helen herself once wrote,

“No pessimist ever discovered the secret of the stars…or opened a new doorway for the human spirit.”

She could have been referring to her own parents whose dogged optimism found the special teacher who unlocked Helen’s fierce intellect and compassion.


Over seven years ago, when my daughter entered the public school system,  I found myself in the uncomfortable position of educating school systems about CVI and convincing people that my daughter can learn if they would learn how to teach her.  

I found myself wondering how Anne Sullivan came to work with Helen Keller.  I wondered what the Kellers had to go through to find her.

I wondered what Kate Keller went through trying unsuccessfully to communicate with her daughter who could no longer see or hear.

I wondered how difficult it was to hope against hope in an age before the telephone, before IDEA, before the Internet.   I struggled to maintain hope and I have those things.

If you are living with a child with CVI (and possibly other disabilities) and you are finding it difficult to find resources or services that can help you and your child, you probably have an idea about how determined and discouraged Kate Keller must have felt at times.

You may recognize how those two conflicting emotions washed over her  – buoying her or drowning her – as she watched her once bright eyed daughter lurch through the house, biting and pushing anyone who kept her from getting her way.  You may have an idea about how desperate she felt to reach her daughter again.

I do.

As a parent of a child with CVI and multiple disabilities, I am grateful to Kate and Arthur Keller for their tenacity and their sacrifice.

Today’s parents are better equipped to fight battles of education and inclusion because of the struggles of parents like them.

Woodrow Wilson (one of the many presidents Helen Keller met in her lifetime) once said

“The man who is swimming against the stream knows the strength of it.”

In honor of Kate Keller and parents of children with CVI across the country and around the world I’d like to update this quote for you:

The mom who is swimming against the stream knows the strength of it.

From history and from our own experience, we know the strength of the stream….(sing along if you know the words)….  a surprising lack of awareness about CVI in the medical and education communities, too few Teachers of the Visually Impaired, no hard, accurate data on the numbers of children with CVI, too few providers/teachers with the specific training necessary to work with children with CVI, low expectations…..

We know the strength of the stream.

Thankfully, we also know that education is not a miracle.

It is a right for every child.

The miracles are the children themselves.

What we do for them will be the best work we ever do.

————————————————————————————————————

 

 

 

 

 

Stone Walls and New Starts

Thank you to Ian Christy, Illustrator Extraordinaire, Designer,  & Cool Rockin’ Dad for the fantastic illustration in this post!

Imagine you were walking down the hallway of an elementary school.  As you walked, you saw brief glimpses through the slender window in each classroom door.  In one class, a teacher stands writing at a whiteboard, her students taking notes.  In another classroom, children gather on a rug for story time.

In the last classroom on the left, you see a similar scene.  Students sitting at their desks, raising their hands, doing their classwork.  You notice that one little girl’s desk is surrounded by a single layer of limestone bricks.

The next day, you walk down the hallway again to see the usual business of learning.  Some children are walking around their room going from station to station.  One class watches the teacher do a science experiment at the front of the class.

In the last classroom, however, you see the little girl’s desk is now surrounded by bricks stacked about 2 feet high.  She is sitting quietly. No one seems to notice them. The teacher stands at the front of the class continuing the lesson.  The students continue raising their hands.

You become concerned.  You return every day.  Every day you look into the last classroom on the left. Every day, the wall of blocks  gets taller and taller.  Every day, the little girl sits quietly, growing more isolated than the day before.  Every day, the classroom moves on around her.  You begin to feel anxious for the little girl.

She is being walled in, cut off from her teacher, her peers, her classroom, but no one seems to notice.  You stand at the window day after day and watch as she disappears behind cold, hard stone.  ian access

You knock on the door and ask the teacher why the little girl is being walled in.  She looks at you as though you have lost your mind.  She cannot see the wall.

You run to the principal’s office to tell him that the little girl is being enclosed in a kid sized stone tower.  The principal goes to look for himself.  He doesn’t see the wall either.

Every day the wall gets higher.

You demand a meeting with the principal, the teacher, and anyone else who works with this little girl.

You show them pictures of stone walls.  You bring them research about limestone.  You find articles from education experts who have studied children behind stone walls for decades, and, who have concluded  (surprise!)  that stone walls make learning very difficult.

Children cannot learn when they are cut off from everyone else.  Stone walls = bad for learning.

The team considers your presentation.  They reluctantly admit that – maybe – they noticed the wall from time to time.  An aide admits she tripped over a brick once but didn’t want to make a fuss about it.

Someone suggests that the stone wall may not be the little’s girl’s only problem.

“Sure,” you reply, “ she may have other issues, BUT, that STONE WALL IS NOT HELPING.”

The educational team takes another couple of weeks to develop a learning plan for the little girl.

Every day, the wall gets higher.

At another meeting, the team tells you that a teacher who works with “stone wall children” will take the little girl out of the stone wall to another room for 30 minutes a week.

But, she’s sitting behind the wall for every other minute of the school day!”

Then, Rod Serling comes out of nowhere, pats you on the head, and, says, to no one in particular, ” Ladies and Gentlemen, you’re entering the wondrous dimension of imagination….Next stop, the Twilight Zone.”

And, scene.


This seems ridiculous, right?  Or, sadly, mind numblingly familiar?

I have spent sooooo much time trying to explain to people that my kid does not have easy access to the world with her visual system.

I have walked by “Library Time” (my personal pet peeve for children with vision loss in a traditional school setting) where I’ve seen children with CVI sitting passively at tables in the back of the library while the librarian reads a book the size of a magazine to the children grouped at the front.

I have found “art projects” in my daughter’s backpack that were clearly colored in by the well meaning aide who finished it while Eliza was self-stimming in the back of the room.  (I know this because I went to art time one day and found everyone – Eliza’s aide included- sitting at the table coloring, except my girl, who was laying on the floor, rocking. I cannot make this stuff up.)

How are these examples any more ridiculous than watching in panic as a child is enclosed in stone, a situation that no one else seems to find problematic?

They aren’t.


To my fellow CVI families,

2018 is a new start. 

There will be opportunities for us as a community to work together to raise awareness about Cortical Visual Impairment and to demand that our children be educated in a manner in which they can learn.

In this year and every year that follows, we must demand access and expertise.  

Stay tuned

and

Happy New Year!

 

 

 

 

Adventures in Advocacy / NE AER / Part 3

Be a life long learner about CVI.

Be a life long learner about the brain.

Ellen Mazel, the CVI Teacher (https://cviteacher.wordpress.com), offers this advice to parents of children with CVI and to the teachers who work with them.

In her presentation at the Northeast AER Conference, Ellen shared information on learning assessments and intervention strategies from her extensive experience as a Cortical Visual Impairment Advisor and a Certified Teacher of the Visually Impaired.

Her audience primarily consisted of TVI and COMS, however, everything about the presentation resonated for me as a parent.  Watching presentations from teachers who know CVI always help me broaden my perspective and recharge my batteries.  It gets discouraging being the only person at an IEP meeting who knows what Cortical Visual Impairment is and how it negatively impacts my daughter’s learning.

Sometimes, after a particularly frustrating day, I think, maybe, I am just kidding myself.  Trying too hard.  My girl is a complex kid.  She is non-verbal and has an additional diagnosis of autism.  We are struggling to find a consistent method of communication.  We do not get a lot of eye contact.  Interaction takes time and effort.  It is hard to read her.  It is hard to know what she understands.  

It is all too easy to develop low expectations for a complicated kid like her.  I have fought against low expectations in IEP meetings and in teacher-parent meetings, yet I have struggled to learn how to reach her myself.  

Ellen’s presentation reminded me that this is an ongoing journey.

Regarding the perspective of the parent/teacher:

  • The importance of presumed competence and eye contact.
    • CVI masks cognitive abilityOur children are often not able to maintain eye contact.  (Children with visual impairments cannot be accurately assessed by traditional cognitive tests.  IQ tests are not going to work on this population of children.) 
    • Research has shown that children who do not maintain eye contact get far less social interaction and attention from caregivers and teachers.  Be aware of this tendency to interact less with a child who does not maintain eye contact.
    • Since we cannot tell what a child who is not maintaining eye contact understands, we have to presume that the child understands and continue to teach the child in an accessible way.  
  • If we expect improvements, we will get improvements. The minute we do not have expectations, we are guaranteed not to get improvement.
  • Read articles and attend presentations.  – Research about CVI and the experience offered by CVI Range endorsed teachers will be found at conferences and in journals before you will be able to find it in a book.  

Regarding IEPs and Assessments:

  • The CVI range endorsement is the beginning of your journey NOT the end.  
    • Yes, we need to demand a teacher who has completed the Perkins-Roman CVI Range endorsement, however, it is only the starting point.
  • IEPs need to say “brain based visual impairment,” when diagnosed, by whom, the score, and the result of the Functional Visual Assessment (as it relates to CVI).  
  • When assessing a child, Ellen uses the CVI Range (Roman), Dr. Gordon Dutton’s survey, and Matt Tietjen’s “What’s the complexity” framework.
  • Remember that the parents’ interview gives all important visual history – if vision has improved – consider CVI
  • Best practice accommodations and modifications should be based on the CVI Range score 
  • Strategies need to be embedded throughout the day
  • Ellen puts together a salient features presentation so everyone on the child’s educational team uses the same language.
  • As a consultant, she advises that the IEP includes a 1 hour in-service about CVI and a 1 hour in-service about how CVI affects this particular child
  • Embed the theory that there is something visual in front of that child all the time.
  • Use more CVI supports in place when developing weaker visual fields.
  • Introduce yourself and use the child’s name so she knows you are talking to her
  • Limit touching and moving children while they are trying to look.

I’ll end with Ellen’s explanation of “infused advocacy,” or teaching the children how to problem solve for themselves.

Parents and teachers can start teaching a child to become a self-advocate by teaching her about the characteristics of CVI and by including her in the process of making her own accommodations and modifications. When a child understands that how she perceives the world is different from other people, she can learn to articulate her unique needs. She could ask other children to say their names when they approach her to help her identify them.   She could explain to her mom that cluttered rooms make her feel anxious or scared. She could tell her teacher that new places are confusing and ask for extra time to get to know a novel environment.

This part of a child’s education, learning how to articulate her needs, is so important.  We spend so much time talking about the kids.  Listening to them (or, in the case of a non-verbal children, quietly observing them) is even more important.

This is a fascinating and busy time in the history of Cortical Visual Impairment.  There is a solid foundation of knowledge and a growing current of educational strategies and research.  There is an active and vocal community of families around the world.  There are teachers who can guide us!

At the center of all of this activity remains the children who have to be equal partners in putting together the puzzle that is their picture of the world. 

 

 

 

 

Adventures in Advocacy / NE AER / Part Two of Three

Hello Fellow Families of Delightful, Sometimes Exasperating Children Who Happen to Have CVI and Who Sometimes Knee You in the Neck,
Why yes, maybe E did wake up at 4:30 this morning and kneed me in the neck while climbing into my bed. Once settled comfortably (for her) on my chest, she leaned over to kiss my forehead about a dozen times. It was pitch black, so let’s just say she missed a few times. In my semi-consciousness, I dreamed I was being water boarded.

This is an accurate description of the power dynamic in our relationship.

Moving on.

I promised more information from NE AER.  This post turned into a doozy.  So, I am splitting it in two.
To recap: There were 6 presentations about CVI at this conference! This is a big deal. Bravo to the Co-Chairs of the 2017 NE/AER Program Committee, Sharon Marie and Martha Delaney for their development of this year’s CVI track.
(You may want to reach out to the folks planning your area’s next AER conference. You could ask how many presentations they will be having on Cortical Visual Impairment. Just a thought.)
I was present for Peg Palmer’s presentation “Assessing children with CVI using Dr. Roman-Lantzy’s CVI Range,” Dr. Christine Roman-Lantzy’s follow up discussion following her “Implications of CVI in the Development of Literacy, Language, and Social Skills” presentation, and Ellen Mazel‘s presentation, “Serving our students with CVI: Learning Assessments and Intervention Strategies.”

Here are some of my takeaways from this conference:

The Perkins-Roman CVI Range endorsement is a necessary starting point and here’s why.  (Good to know for future stare-downs with school administrators about the importance of proper training for the teachers who work with our children.)

Right off the bat, Dr. Roman-Lantzy asked the discussion group if any of them were unsure about the CVI Range endorsement.
As a parent, I was surprised by this question. I’m just glad an endorsement exists  to give teachers the skills they need to improve educational outcomes for our children. I was more surprised when a few of the teachers raised their hands.

Dr. Roman-Lantzy asked them why they had reservations.
One of the teachers explained that she knew several experienced TVI who did great work with children with CVI but did not have the endorsement. Some teachers did not see the point of the endorsement. Some thought the CVI Range endorsement was extra work – more hoops to jump through at their own expense- for teachers who already had substantial experience working with children with CVI.
Dr. Roman-Lantzy acknowledged their doubts and agreed that there are experienced TVI who are more than capable of working with children with CVI. She mentioned that she herself is not endorsed.  (My mind was blown.)
Her point – an important one – was that while CVI has been discussed over the years within the field of the education of children with vision loss, there has yet to be a rigorous, commonly accepted standard of training for teachers to work with children with CVI.

(This leads me to paraphrase Ellen Mazel. My apologies to Ellen Mazel. )

The 2 most dangerous teachers Ellen Mazel has ever met are
1. The TVI who has never heard of CVI
2. The TVI who has been to one workshop / conference on CVI.
Boy, did that resonate with me. I wonder how many of us have had a teacher tell us – “Oh, I know CVI. I took a workshop once.”
Surely, it’s not just me. I bet I’d recognize the slight indentation on your forehead where you banged your head on the table after hearing these words. It’s okay. I’ve got one too.

We have been affirmed by the CVI Teacher herself!

This was worth the whole trip to Vermont, including losing my driver’s license, and, the resulting extra security patdowns to get home.
Now some history on the development of the CVI Range endorsement.

(Use this when you begin advocating for your child by telling your school system that a CVI Range endorsed educator is a requirement for your child’s ACCESS to her education.)
The lack of a standard educational protocol for training TVI to work with children with CVI has been a concern for Dr. Roman-Lantzy for years. In recent years, she went to the associations that recommend topics of study for university TVI preparation programs.

She asked them to recommend that CVI be included, to no avail.

Then, she approached Perkins School for the Blind.

Perkins met the challenge of training teachers to educate children with the #1 pediatric visual impairment in America and
First World Countries
(and tomorrow and 9 months from now and 2 years from now).

It’s not going away, folks.

To address the growing need, Dr. Roman-Lantzy and Perkins collaborated to create the endorsement and other classes surrounding specific aspects of CVI.
For their willingness to address the issue of CVI, this CVI mom applauds Perkins and its President and CEO, Dave Power. Dave Power is also the father of a son with dual sensory impairments. It does not surprise me that a parent of a special needs child made the decision to move the CVI Range endorsement forward.
During the discussion session, Dr. Roman-Lantzy explained that “no one is getting rich off of the CVI Range endorsement.” There are administrative costs to running the classes which are offset by the fees.
She further explained that the creation of the CVI Range endorsement was a way to acknowledge that every endorsee has the same foundation of knowledge about CVI and has the ability to use the CVI Range accurately and effectively.  The endorsement means you know how to use the CVI range, however, knowing how to address the unique learning needs of every child identified with CVI is an ongoing learning process. CVI is a complex diagnosis. It covers a wide spectrum of children with varied abilities. Research is still unfolding.

Learning all things CVI is happening for all of us in real time.
Hearing this discussion, I can understand why an overworked Teacher of the Visually Impaired with too many children on her caseload and fewer available resources would be dubious about extra training for a “new” visual impairment.

She does not have extra time. She is being pulled in too many directions. Depending on the state and depending on the day, she may be expected to provide early intervention in the morning for an infant with albinism in a neighboring county; at lunchtime, she may be pulled into an IEP meeting for a 4th grader with nystagmus; in the afternoon, she may be transcribing civics homework into braille for a high school senior who is blind.
Changes in our educational system to give TVI fewer caseloads, more resources, more extensive professional development, and the time it requires to do their job well need to happen yesterday.
It is simply too much to ask these teachers to do more.

BUT,

nothing about having a child with Cortical Visual Impairment is simple. 
Until we can get universities to add CVI to their teacher preparation programs

AND,
until we can make sweeping changes in the system of educating children with vision loss

We have to ask.

Our children can’t wait. (Ellen Mazel again, everyone!)

Yet, they are waiting.

Every day a child with CVI sits in a classroom without appropriate accommodations – without ACCESS – to her education, she is losing learning time.

The awareness of time lost is the motor that drives CVI parents to ask overworked teachers to learn more about CVI.  It is why we ask them to help us give our children access.

To wrap up this post, I will repeat what I said to the TVI and COMS in my presentation.

We need you to believe that our children can learn.  

We don’t expect you to have all the answers.  

Help us find the answers.  

We have to start somewhere.  

Thanks to these formidable ladies, we have a starting point.  

 

CVI ladies

Adventures in Advocacy / NE AER / Ellen Mazel / Standing Room Only, Part 1

standing room onlyThe Northeast AER Conference in Burlington, Vermont wrapped up Friday, November 17th.

Thursday, it was standing room only for Ellen Cadigan Mazel, M. Ed. CTVI. Ellen is the CVI Program Manager for the Perkins School for the Blind. (Her blog, CVI Teacher at wordpress.com is required reading for CVI parents, TVI and anyone who cares about a child with CVI.)

The information and discussions that arose from the presentations at NE AER should be another post topic.  I will do that one next.

For now, I will share briefly what I experienced and what I learned from discussions in and around the presentations.

First, it made my mom’s heart glad to see so much interest in CVI.  The fact that Ellen’s presentation was standing room only and Peg Palmer’s would have been if it had been in a smaller room was encouraging.

Many TVI, COMS, and administrators showed up to learn more about the condition that affects our children’s access to the world.

There were 6 presentations on Cortical Visual Impairment during the 3 day event.  Dr. Christine Roman-Lantzy was there!  I was present for an eye-opening discussion session. (Saved for Part 2) 

(I couldn’t stay for Matt Tietjen’s presentation on What’s the Complexity, but I really wanted to.  I highly recommend parents and teachers familiarize themselves with his work around complexity and literacy.  It is a perspective we all need to understand to help our children make progress visually and to understand what they are seeing. Check out the Perkins CVI Hub for the next class or webinar.)

This amount of information and discussion about CVI at an AER (the Association for the Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired) conference was unprecedented.

It would be great to see this kind of interest at every 2018 AER conference in every state or region of the United States and Canada.

Wouldn’t it? 

To share this opinion, you can find your state’s AER at http://www.aerbvi.org.

Find the president of your state’s AER and send her/him an email about your child, about CVI, and about the need for more teachers trained in understanding CVI.

You could ask them how we as parents can support our TVI in this training.  You could ask them what we need to do help make progress in getting CVI recognized as the #1 pediatric visual impairment in First World Countries. 

I mean, since it is.

Also, you can send the email to these folks too:

AER’s Executive Director, Lou Tutt, lou@aerbvi.org 

AER’s Chair of the Personnel Preparation Committee, Olga Overbury at olga.overbury@umontreal.ca

AER’s Chair of the (provisional?) Neurological Visual Impairment Committee, Susan Sullivan at ssullivan@aph.org 

Since I had given my presentation to essentially the same audience at Peg Palmer’s presentation the day before, I shared other parent stories from the previous post where I asked you what you would say to a room filled with TVI.

This is what I shared:

From Kathryne in LA:  “My theory on the lack of interest in addressing outcomes for CVI is that our kids have all been lumped as multiple disabilities.  Incompetence is assumed. That is not to say that blind children can’t have multiple disabilities, but CVI is more prevalent in the multiple disabilities class.  Since it’s more work other therapists and teachers ignore it. 

Addressing my son’s vision has given him more improvement in all areas.  More than any other therapy.  We are now starting to see improvements in other areas now that vision has improved.  

She asked me to point out that many of the other skills will follow if vision is improved.” 

 

From Anna in OH: Show care, compassion and patience.  If someone is asking for a CVI Endorsed provider, there is a reason.  

The good news about CVI is that we can do something about it.  Please accept the challenge to learn more about our children.  It will be worth it!

Please listen to the parents’ concerns and ideas.  Their children are their life, their whole world. Parents do know what they are talking about.

A passionate/trained/knowledgeable/driven CVI Endorsed provider is worth their weight in gold.” 

Then, I shared a couple of stories about the frustrations parents face when looking for appropriate educational services for our children.

One mom called her local university teacher preparation program for teachers of the visually impaired and asked if CVI was covered in the curriculum.  The head of the program told her no.  When she asked why, he said, We can’t be all things to all people.” 

One mom called her state’s School for the Blind when her son was identified as having Cortical Visual Impairment.  When she told them her child’s diagnosis, she was told, We don’t serve those kids here.  It’s too expensive to train our teachers in CVI.”  

If these 2 stories frustrate you, they should.  We have a lot of work to do to raise awareness and to raise our expectations of how our children are taught in their educational placements.

There will be more to come on this.

And, I wore this shirt. t-shirt

 

Brenda, the kickass mom from Seattle and the brains behind the blog and FB page, Start Seeing CVI,  made them and some proceeds of sales go the growing Pediatric Cortical Visual Impairment Society.

What a lovely holiday gift, if I do say so myself!   https://startseeingcvi.com/?s=T-shirt

More to come to wrap up NE AER.

Until then, Happy Thanksgiving!  I continue to be grateful for other parents who remind me that we in this together.

Because we are.

 

 

Northeast AER 2017 / Adventures in Advocacy / Peg Palmer knows CVI

Good morning fellow families of well loved children who happen to have Cortical Visual Impairment,

I am writing from the Burlington Hilton where the 2017 Northeast AER conference is well under way.  I have heard that the attendance is roughly 300 TVI, COMS (Certified Orientation & Mobility Specialists), Low Vision Therapists, Occupational Therapists, Physical Therapists, with some program directors thrown in for good measure.

This is a great turnout.

Thanks to the efforts of Dr. Roman-Lantzy and people who lead the DeafBlind Projects in the Northeastern United States, this part of the country is well ahead of the curve on awareness of Cortical Visual Impairment.  There are TVI here who received training from Dr. Roman-Lantzy over 10 years ago and have been honing their skills and gaining knowledge ever since.

This conference has a CVI track – meaning there are presentations on various aspects of CVI in almost every time slot.   This may be almost unheard of at a conference like this.  It certainly is from my personal experience in which I show up at conferences and ask questions about CVI just to see what the response will be.  The response is usually a cold, hard stare from the presenter who is probably wondering who let a parent in.

It is refreshing and maddening at the same time.

Yesterday, Peg Palmer, a Perkins-Roman CVI Range Endorsed TVI with decades of experience, allowed me to hijack 15 minutes of her presentation about the CVI Range.

A shout out to Peg Palmer whose professionalism and compassion knows no bounds.  Connecticut is lucky to have her.  Her presentation on working through the CVI Range was very informative.  The videos of students she showed elicited a lively conversation and a lot of questions.

Exactly what we need.

I was able to talk to a room of 50 TVI and COMS (with a few therapists and a couple of program directors thrown in) to give them a parent’s perspective.  I shared some of my story as E’s mom and how challenging it has been to get CVI recognized, let alone understood in classrooms.

I asked them three things:

1.To believe in our children’s ability to learn

The presence of CVI is not an indicator of cognitive ability.  (Source:  The CVI page on the American Printing House for the Blind website)

I told them the Lego Tree story (see post on Lego Trees) and explained how easy it is for teachers, aides, and therapists to develop low expectations for our children if they do not understand the characteristics of CVI.  How many learning opportunities get lost if a teacher does not understand latency and lack of visual reach?  Too many.

2. To reach out to AER and to ask them make CVI a priority in professional development and in university teacher preparation programs

A few weeks ago, I had a meeting with the Executive Director of AER, Louis Tutt, and the Deputy Executive Director, Ginger Croce.  They very kindly answered my questions about AER’s slow recognition of Cortical Visual Impairment.  Only last year, did AER put together a provisional committee on Neurological Visual Impairment.  

Mr. Tutt told me AER responds to the concerns of its members.  So, if AER members contacted the president of their state chapter with the message that more professional development needs to happen for TVI and that future TVI needed to get more training on CVI, progress would be made.

Now we know.

Did you know that parents can join AER as a Associate Member for $98/year?  This is a non-voting membership category for anyone who is not employed in the field such as a parent or caregiver.

FYI:  Here are some email addresses you may find useful.

Executive Director, Louis Tutt – lou@aerbvi.org

Chair of the Neurological Visual Impairment Committee, Susan Sullivan, ssullivan@aph.org

Chair of the Personnel Preparation Committee, Olga Overbury, olga.overbury@umontreal.ca

You can find the president of your state AER chapter at aerbvi.org.

You could tell the powers-that-be at AER that you are the parent of a child with CVI and that you value their dedication to children with vision loss.

You could tell them that children with Cortical Visual Impairment, just like children with ocular vision loss, are not incidental learners (See how that came in handy?).

You could tell them that children with CVI require a different educational approach than children with ocular vision loss.

You could ask them to make educating children with CVI (the #1 Pediatric Visual Impairment in the United States and the Western world) a priority.  That means university teacher preparation programs need to add CVI to their curricula.  That means school systems need to provide extensive, ongoing professional development.

Understand this.  No one has all the answers.  This condition is complicated.  Each child is unique.

What we need to ask is that they join us in asking the right questions and seeking the answers.

3. To seek out more training

I told them about the Perkins-Roman CVI Range Endorsement.  I told them it wasn’t fair to ask them to do more training when that are understaffed and overworked.  I also said the training they got for children with ocular vision loss does not work with our kids.

So, to sweeten the deal, I offered pie.

Really, it’s all I’ve got. me-and-peg-e1510842788984.png