Calling CVI Moms: The Conversation Continues

sorrows borne

Hello Fellows Moms, Dads, and Folks who love a child with CVI,

I adapted the title of this post from the American Printing House for the Blind page on CVI (http://tech.aph.org/cvi/).

Their title is CVI:  The conversation continues….

When reading sites about CVI, I see plenty of conversation about CVI among certain researchers, doctors, and teachers. It is happening more now than ever.  This is a good thing.

But, where are the stories of the families?  Of the children themselves?  Where are the stories of the people whose lives are affected by CVI 24 hours a day? 

I love the quote,

“All sorrows can be borne if you put them into a story or tell a story about them.”

It is attributed to the author, Karen Blixen, who wrote under the name Isak Dinesen.  (She knew a thing or two about sorrow.)

If you belong to this community of families, it is highly likely you and your family have withstood a significant amount of sorrow on this journey.

Children with Cortical Visual Impairment (Cerebral Visual Impairment) are children who have endured much at a young age.  Some were premature and suffered a brain bleed.  Some had a stroke in-utero or soon after birth.  Some had hypoxia (not enough oxygen in-utero or during birth).  Some have brains with atypical structures.   Some have seizures.  Some have metabolic issues.  Some have genetic syndromes.  Some children acquire CVI at a later time after a traumatic brain injury.  And, I have probably missed other causes.  My apologies.

Some children have any combination of the above.

The conditions which cause CVI are complicated and vary widely from child to child.

As the parents of these children, we bear witness to what our children endure.  There is sorrow when you see your children suffering or struggling.  There is frustration, and certainly, sorrow in navigating what your child needs to learn and to thrive. It can be so isolating and confusing.

Stories can help us bear the sorrow.  Stories can help us navigate the unfamiliar territory of having children with a complicated neurological visual impairment.  Stories will ultimately move us in the right direction of having more medical and education professionals who recognize and understand CVI.

We need your stories.

Jessica Marquardt from North Carolina was the first Mom on Monday.  It is an honor to share her story.

We need to hear your story.  It’s easy.  It’s important!

Read the questions below.

Answer the ones you would like to answer.

Submit them to info@cvimomifesto.com.

Parent stories will be posted on Mondays.

Moms on Mondays

Introduction:  Your first name, your child’s first name and age, the state you live in

(If you would prefer to use an initial instead of your name, fine!  If you’d like to share a picture, great!)

About your child:  What does she like to do?  What makes him laugh?  What are her favorite activities?  What do you like to do as family?

When did you first learn about CVI?

How were you given the diagnosis?

Does your child have other diagnoses you’d like to mention?  (Totally up to you)

How is/was your child’s Early Intervention experience with regard to CVI? (Were your providers knowledgeable? Were they open to learning?)

How is CVI being addressed in your child’s school setting? (If applicable.)

What do you know now that you wish you had known at the beginning of your journey as your child’s mom? 

What would you tell a mother whose child has just been identified as having CVI?

What would you like for people who have never heard of CVI to know? 

Hopes and dreams?  Anything else you’d like to add?  


Looking forward to your stories and meeting your beautiful children!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published by

CVI Momifesto

CVIMomifesto is a blog dedicated to parent advocacy and community for families of children with Cortical Visual Impairment.

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